Adolfo “Harpo” Celaya – an intimate story with a U.S.S. Indianapolis survivor

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A Halloween Chill

TUCSON – Heads up trick-or-treaters, this Halloween will bring a spooky chill to the area and temperatures will quickly fall into the 50s as soon as 8 PM tonight.

Much cooler air has filtered into the region after yesterday’s cold front and a Freeze Warning – the first of the season – has been issued for the coolest sections of SE Arizona. So expect freezing to briefly sub-freezing temperatures in the areas shaded in purple.

Here’s a list of forecast lows for sections of the region tonight.

Finally, this cool air mass isn’t too rare for this time of year.

So bundle up and enjoy the changing of the seasons.

Closing time for 90 degrees in Tucson

TUCSON – The last time Tucson reached 90 degrees or more was on September 30th. This may not seem like a huge deal but we’ve reached 100 degrees many times in October.

The last time the City of Tucson went through an entire month of October without reaching 90 degrees was in 1984.

It will be a close call this weekend, and right now the forecast calls for 88 & 89 degrees for Saturday and Sunday respectively.

Slightly cooler air is slated for the begging of next week, so if we don’t hit 90 this weekend – we likely make it through the entire month without 90 degree heat. Not bad huh?

The October chill continues

TUCSON – Today marked the 12th consecutive day the City of Tucson has seen below average temperatures. Out of the 17 days so far this month, 14 have been below average.

If you compare the first 17 days of October this year to last year, well there is simply no comparison. This year’s average October temperature is more than 10 degrees cooler.

We’re off to the coldest start to October since 1982 – when through the first 17 days the average temperature was 67.4 degrees.

Many years we talk about the latest 100 degree day occurring in October: well forget about that. The highest temperature we’ve recorded this month has been a “cool” 89 degrees.

Don’t look now but warmer weather is in the forecast, but even highs on the warmest days look to only be a degree or two above average.

With two weeks still remaining of the month, it would take a major heat wave to put the entire month of October above average…and that isn’t in the forecast. This means October 2018 will be the first below average month we’ve seen since September of 2016.

What month is it? More cold, rain and snow is here.

TUCSON – Rain overspread much of metro Tucson – AGAIN – tonight and more rain is in the forecast tonight through Tuesday. And oh, don’t look now, but more rain is possible this weekend and even into next week if we can tap into Tropical Storm Tara.

Okay back to the big chill: the first 15 days of October have been colder than the first 15 days of November last year. (How is that even possible?)

So halfway through the month, we now rank as the 19th coldest October since records have been kept (1894). What’s more staggering is if you take out most of the colder October’s which occurred at the beginning of the 20th century, this October ranks as the 4th coldest since 1959! Only the first 15 days of October in 1966, 1970, and 1982 were colder!

 

And by the way, it’s currently snowing on top of Mt. Graham. See the image below.

Recent rain puts Tucson in a monsoon surplus for the fifth straight year

TUCSON – Record rain (0.76″) on Wednesday put the monsoon total in Tucson at 7.01″. This is the fifth year in-a-row that the City of Tucson has exceeded its monsoon average of 6.08″.

In addition, for the first time since the early 1980s, Tucson has picked up over 7.00″ of rain in three consecutive years.

Drought conditions remain across much of the State of Arizona and according to chief Meteorologist Matt Brode, this is in part due to fewer Winter storms over the past several years.

Abundant monsoon rain has the City of Tucson in a small yearly surplus, but we’ll need to pick up about another 3″ of rain through the end of the year to match our annual average of almost 12″ of rain.

Weigh in on Today’s Record Heat